Discipline, a scary concept that will save you


19d5a118b366e57082a40a966743bfd0My guess is, if you’re a love addict, the concept of “discipline” either makes no sense to you (that’s only something the military needs to practice, right?), or you recoil from the mere mention of it (sex dungeons, disciplinary parents and hard work, oh my!). Either way, love addicts have virtually zero self-discipline. At least when it comes to relationships.

How and why we tend to be less disciplined people is a mystery. From my own experience, I was raised in a somewhat unruly environment. I would certainly get into trouble if I did something wrong (I used to sneak into my mother’s closet, pull out a dress of hers, and then take scissors and cut it  up into pieces so that it fit me. Needless to say, I got into trouble from time to time). But on the whole, I would have to say my parents were not disciplinarians, nor was their parenting very consistent. I grew up, in fact, believing that discipline was a bad thing for creative individuals and that people “like us” should be without boundaries or rules, simply living free so as to express themselves…

Those beliefs, as idealistic and freeing as they seemed at the time,  were not very realistic. They translated into a rather directionless, undisciplined adult who ended up not really knowing the benefit of boundaries, rules, self-discipline and deferred gratification. And who certainly never had the self-discipline to make many of her creative ideas come to fruition.

Only now, after years of recovery, do I truly understand how faulty and self-sabotaging those beliefs were. And they were all based on a lack of understanding about the idea of discipline. To me, it was “bad.” Discipline was for non-creative, military-types. Period.

I was so wrong.

Setting the record straight, here are three powerful definition of discipline, taken from Wikipedia:

  1. Discipline is the assertion over more base desires, and is usually understood to be synonymous with self control. Self-discipline is to some extent a substitute for Motivation. 
  2. Discipline is when one uses reason to determine the best course of action that opposes one’s desires, which is the opposite of Fun.
  3. Self-discipline—what many people call “will-power”—refers to the ability to persist at difficult or unpleasant tasks until they are completed. People who possess high self-discipline are able to overcome reluctance to begin tasks and stay on track despite distractions. Those with low self-discipline procrastinate and show poor follow-through, often failing to complete tasks—even tasks they want very much to complete.

For a love addict wanting and needing to become healthier, self-discipline is a must. We must learn to overcome obsessive thoughts, stop reaching out to our PoAs, change our current behavior, and change the way we think about certain big ticket items like love, relationships and who we are. All this takes loads of self-discipline.

So, how do you become more disciplined? There are a few resources on the internet to help. Forbes magazine gives a leadership version here. And then there’s Pick the Brain that offers tips for self-discipline when it comes to things like getting to the gym. Both set of tips can be applied to love addiction. But my personal favorite resource on self-discipline comes from Uncommon Help, a site designed for self-help and awareness. Read the 7 Self-Discipline Techniques. Then, print it out. Read it daily. Repeat.

Discipline is not scary. It’s the internal force that allows you to choose the apple over the donut, get up and go to the gym when you don’t feel like it or make decisions based on reason and logic, rather than emotion. Discipline is often a trait you’re born with, but it can be a learned behavior. But it is one concept that many love addicts fear. Why? Because discipline means change. It means giving up something in the short term to get to something far greater and far more rewarding in the long term. It means kissing the safety blanket of your addiction (i.e. your person of addiction and your addictive behavior) goodbye by stepping up to the plate and taking control of your life. It means having the willingness to take the risk to be a better person.

If you need a motivating mantra to start being more self-disciplined, use this: Enough already. I need to grow up. I need to stop being a little child, acting out, getting what he/she wants and crying when I don’t. I need to see value in disciplined behavior. Especially if it means living a more authentic, happy life. 

Now, go get ’em!

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5 thoughts on “Discipline, a scary concept that will save you

  1. So true! Discipline is essential & us LA did not have consistent anything really. I love the last part of ur mantra/affirmation, “go get me, to live a more happy life” The first part , maybe is because I’m more of a feeler but it wouldn’t work for me, it sounds to shaming. And the shame & negative self talk& words would spiral me back into my rabbit hole. I tried to reframe exercise & a more structured life as gifts that we’re loving to myself. Your blog is amazing!
    Mary

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  2. I’m going to read this over and over…it most certainly, embarrassingly, applies to me. Although I have been aware of my lack of self-discipline for years (decades!!!ack!), little has changed. Why? Because I distracted myself with relationships and obsessions on my family and the past instead of getting busy!

    I’m a very brave person, who has led a very interesting life full of adventures and travel, but I was a love addict the whole time, and all of my adventures added up to a whole lot of not much beside personal experience. Valuable, yes, but I’m 43 years old, with no vocation, no money in the bank, no business (my dream), and not much community to speak of. The stuff self-discipline is a requirement for.

    So far.

    I’m not giving up!!! Tracy Shields, thanks for lighting the way! I’m following your lead. Slowly but surely, to a self-disciplined life.

    Thanks for your honesty and the encouragement embedded in your writing!

    -Blue Fox

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    1. Blue Fox…are you sure we are not the same person?!? I am 44 now and have lived the same life…and now left with nothing much going for myself. I’m now on recovery for love addiction and can now see the light at the end of the tunnel of “nothingness”!

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