Are you a sexual communicator?


I heard the term “sexual communicator” many years ago, though not exactly in that form. My mother used to say that I had to be careful not to “communicate sexually” with people I was not sexually attracted to, otherwise, they’d get the wrong idea. Looking back, I definitely communicated on a sexual level, but I didn’t see it as a problem, until I got into recovery.

Sexual communication most often has three associations:

  • communication that is sexual in nature and appropriate between two people who are or who plan to be sexually intimate,
  • narcissism as it applies to the narcissistic personality disorder, and
  • excessive flirting as it relates to the sex addict

I do not want to talk about any of these types of communication, although the last one might be closely related to this discussion.

What I’m talking about is far more subtle and difficult to recognize. Here are some of the signs you might be a sexual communicator:

  • Difficulty talking to men as “friends” or “acquaintances” on a non-sexual level (especially men you are not attracted to or who are unavailable)
  • Not feeling comfortable in clothing unless it’s “sexy”
  • No interest in going out with friends unless the potential for flirting or meeting and talking to mates is present
  • No interest in people, places or activities that don’t have a sexual element to them
  • Feeling most comfortable only when able to flirt or speak using sexual innuendos or behavior
  • Averting eye contact with people, unless there is sexual communication
  • Displaying sexual body language or leading the conversation in a sexual, flirtatious direction with almost anyone
  • Consciously or unconsciously wondering if the person you are talking to finds you “attractive.”

If any of these points sound familiar, you may be a sexual communicator. But here’s the thing: communicating sexually with someone you are intimately involved with is acceptable and healthy; communicating sexually with your married neighbor, your co-workers, your boss, your friends, your friend’s boyfriend, or people you do not intend to have an intimate relationship with is, well, dangerous and unhealthy.

Communicating sexually puts all conversations –even platonic ones– on a heightened sexual level and removes the possibility of knowing people on many different levels, thus narrowing the scope and experience of relating to the world. When you remove sexuality from a conversation, what do you have? To a sexual communicator, you have a boring conversation. But to a healthy person, you have the potential to understand and know people on an intellectual, emotional or spiritual level. You also have the potential to create non-intense relationships that you are not instantly bound to. Sexual communicators tend to become intense and locked into close relationships with people, cross boundaries, date people with many red flags and hop into relationships they later regret.

So, how do you change the way you communicate if you’re a sexual communicator?

The first step is to be aware of these signs, aware of your motives when speaking to people and aware of your ability (or inability) to change your behavior.

I was a sexual communicator nearly all my life–until one experience changed my life.  I was in grad school and took a part-time job teaching at a community college. As many of you know, male students can and will flirt with their teachers. And nearly all my life, I was very used to flirting and getting male attention. But, I knew it was my responsibility as a teacher to create clear boundaries between me and my students. I noticed, however, that any time I spoke to a male student I would wonder, as I always had, “Is he attracted to me?” Almost immediately, I felt this wasn’t a healthy way to relate to my students. I was nearly 40, I was professional, and these students were here to learn, not to flirt with their teacher! It was at this point in my life I forced myself to communicate another way and block my sexually communicative nature. By doing that, it opened up a whole new world of relating to and understanding people.

I sexualized men all my life. Every man I would meet I would only be able to relate to him on a sexual level. This was so narrowing and limiting. Now, I communicate with men as friends and am able to have a better understanding of who people are on a personal level, not a sexual one. More importantly, was removing my habit of communicating sexually while dating. This allowed me to get to know my husband as a friend first. And while we are free to communicate on a sexual level now, it’s not the ONLY way we communicate. How nice.

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